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Sales is not a sprint but a marathon!!

I happened to watch a portion of a documentary on marathon running. What I learnt is that it calls for more preparation than what is required for a sprint. Endurance is key for a marathon.

While speed and agility are important for a Sprint, one should save energy and stay in the game at a consistent pace, to be successful in a Marathon. But both require stringent practice. It’s needless to state that the training is completely different for each.

What can we learn from these and apply in our day to day Sales situations?

  1. Sales is not done on a level playing field.
  2. Techniques are for short term whereas in the longer term these simply don’t work.
  3. While a good start can give us a boost and make us look confident, it is only consistent performance that is going to keep us in good stead in the long term.
  4. Practice makes us perfect. So, let’s start practicing.
  5. Each situation is different. It may be a well laid out road / a pathway / a narrow path filled with stones or thorns / an uphill or downhill and it may rain / shine. Just like running a marathon, Sales situations also call for using our judgement on the ground.
  6. We should use our limited resources in a rationale manner.
  7. Let’s be prepared for the long haul.
  8. We may have to incorporate changes [slowing down or picking up speed] as we go along.
  9. We should focus on the rhythm and keep going forward.
  10. We should have less burn out for maximum productivity.
  11. We should know the route map well and be prepared for the encounters on the way.
  12. Most importantly we should enjoy the journey.

Some portions of a marathon resembles a sprint. So, the techniques will come in handy. We must be trained to handle such sudden sprints as well. And we should respond with speed and agility when the situation demands.

So, Sales is not just a marathon but a “series of sprints” as well. Success in one sprint or couple of sprints don’t guarantee success in the marathon. Marathon is a different ball game altogether.

If we know how to enjoy it, it will be a breeze.

Happy Learning!

Happy Selling!!

Contact us at:

sales at zignalytics dot com

#sales #salestips #crm

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Big Potatoes rise to the Top on a rough road!

American football player Knute Rockne said this: “When the going gets tough, the tough get going.”

When floods or Tsunamis cause a havoc, we have seen people rising to the occasion and providing help. What about the people who are affected? What do we learn from them? We will get to that in a bit.

Robert H. Schuller explains a true story from a village called Idaho in his book “Tough Times Never Last, But Tough People Do!”

Story now: Idaho has potato farmers. As you may know, potatoes are priced according to their sizes. The big potatoes are priced high, then the medium ones & the smaller ones are priced low. They are first sorted, bagged and only then loaded on to trucks.

Farmers spent a lot of time and effort in grading the potatoes those days. But not one farmer.

People asked him how does he manage it. He said he took the roughest road to the town. And naturally, the big potatoes rise to the top, medium potatoes land in the middle & the small ones fall to the bottom.

Schuller says this is not only true to potatoes but a law of life. If you are tough, you will rise to the top.

The rough road has to end at some point. And it will.

Coming back to the lessons from a natural disaster, people get really tough. They are forced to become tough to sail through. Their mindset is tough. How shall I explain? They think they can achieve anything. Nothing is an obstacle for them. And their bodies naturally adapt.

Sales is tough. Get tough to sail through.

Some ideas to get tough, from Robert Schuller:

  1. Dare to dream.
  2. Commit yourself to it.
  3. Dare to try and to take risk.
  4. Failure is an event and not a person.
  5. Never quit. Never ever.
  6. Hold on for a little more time.
  7. Inspire others.
  8. Beginning is half done.
  9. Pay the price. Full price.
  10. Practice Possibility Thinking: Never reject an idea / a possibility because –
    • you see something wrong
    • you won’t get the credit
    • it’s impossible
    • your mind is already made up
    • it’s illegal
    • you don’t have the money, manpower, muscle, or time to achieve it
    • it will create conflict
    • it’s not your way of doing things
    • it might fail
    • it’s sure to succeed [What? yes some people are so humble that they don’t want to succeed]

Get Tough!

Happy Selling!!

#salestips #successtips

sales @ zignalytics dot com

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Freedom from Fear!

If we think deeply on what’s stopping us from realizing our goals, it is nothing but FEAR.

Fear stops us from realizing our true potential.

But fear can be good as well. It can help us address problems early and solve them. Sometimes even before we encounter them. But solving problems before we encounter is being over cautious. That’s not necessary.

More than Planning and Execution, what is important is this: Persistence. That is the single most important ingredient for Success.

Persistence can be the antidote to Fear. There’s nothing that cannot be achieved with Persistence. Simply nothing.

In Sales, we have fear of rejection and that stops us from even approaching a client. The bright side is that there are a million Opportunities worth pursuing. There is someone whose needs you readily match. Find them. Get them. In the process, you will lose many opportunities, but that’s fine.

Fear need not be feared but needs to be addressed and overcome.

In Edward De Bono’s Six Thinking Hats, there’s a RED hat that signifies feelings, hunches and intuition. It is important to address fears, likes, dislikes, loves, and hates.

Even to Lose a game, we need to first PLAY.

So let’s PLAY without FEAR.

Happy Playing!

Happy Selling!

sales@zignalytics.com

#sales #fear #persistence

 

 

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What can we learn from Uber?

 

After seeing Uber’s first pitch deck that they made in Aug 2008 [ https://medium.com/@gc/the-beginning-of-uber-7fb17e544851 ], I think we can safely make the following inferences:

  1. We are grossly underestimating ourselves.
  2. You don’t need to know everything to the last detail when you start off.
  3. You don’t need to have big dreams. If you dream of a small office with 10 cabs, it is just fine.
  4. Don’t make a pitch. It doesn’t matter. What matters is this: Your product or service. If it is useful, efficient, cheap, saves time then it will sell. Pitches don’t sell.
  5. Customers are always looking for a better product or service at a cheaper price. They are not willing to pay more. Look at the total volume of sales and the net profit you will make instead of the % you make in every single transaction.
  6. With so many scandals – toxic work place culture to squeezing drivers pay to delaying drivers payments, if Uber can be valued at US $ 69 Billion, think of the value one can create if those scandals are avoided. But, at the end of the day, scandals don’t matter. Service does.
  7. We should take only the good things [focus on the +ves], leave the rest and move on.
  8. We should adapt fast to the changing landscape.
  9. We should be in news always, preferably for the right reasons unlike Uber.
  10. You don’t need to invent anything new. If you solve one problem, it is just fine.
  11. You don’t need to think 10 years ahead or be futuristic. But when the opportunity presents itself, you should be able to kick ass, grab it and scale up in no time.
  12. Execution is of paramount importance. Idea is a given.

Happy Selling !!

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How high achievers overcome their fear of failure?

Fear of failure: Most of us are afraid of Failures. It is because of this fear, we seldom start.

“The secret of getting ahead is getting started.” – Mark Twain

  1. We don’t like failures. But what we fail [no pun, no intention here] to understand is that without failing we will not be able to succeed. So, start accepting and embracing failures.
  2. And without failing we will not evolve to become better individuals than what we are today. Failure is utmost essential for our growth. So, don’t be afraid to FAIL.
  3. If we are not failing at all, it means we are not trying anything new. And that means we have stopped innovating. This can only lead to negative growth and winding up soon. Throw your fear to the ground, get up and start pumping iron and run.
  4. Learn from others. The high achievers learn from others as much as they dare to try new things.
  5. We like to be within our comfort zone. And we don’t like changes. But success lies outside our comfort zone. Always.
  6. Teach yourself new skills. Not necessarily in your trade or profession. It can be anything from swimming to karathe to table tennis to golf to computer programming to learning a foreign language.
  7. Success does not teach us anything. Early success only makes one arrogant, complacent and capable of permanently failing. “Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they can’t lose.” – Bill Gates
  8. Do things you have never done before. High achievers don’t aim for incremental improvements. Instead they go in a different direction and build new solutions. That are a complete paradigm shift.
  9. Make “ACTION” your mantra. Right or wrong, take action. Inaction is worse than failure.
  10. Be BOLD. Success does not like cowards.

Happy Selling !!

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What can Sales people learn from “The Walk” and Philippe Petit

From Wikipedia: “The Walk is a 2015 American 3D biographical drama film directed by Robert Zemeckis and written by Christopher Browne and Zemeckis. It is based on the story of 24-year-old French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center on August 7, 1974.”

the-walk-movie-642628

 

What were the steps taken by Philippe Petit to achieve the final outcome of walking between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York in 1974 ? How did he achieve what he wanted to ? What must have gone through his mind during the event ? How can someone achieve such a rare feat ? And what can we learn from his walk on the high-wire ?

Let us now examine one after the other.

Steps taken by Philippe Petit:

  1. He dreamed at an early age and thought it was possible to walk on the tight rope at such an altitude.
  2. He came to know from a magazine about the construction of World Trade Center while sitting in a dentist’s clinic and found that it will be the tallest building in the world.
  3. He conceived his idea.
  4. Planned meticulously.
  5. Traveled to New York several times.
  6. He and one of his collaborators, a photographer rented a helicopter and photographed the under construction towers.
  7. Had few other collaborators and friends who helped him. One of them provided financial assistance as well.
  8. Entered the building as a Journalist and in the pretext of interviewing the workers observed the towers from close quarters.
  9. Got caught by a Policeman once but that didn’t dampen his dreams.
  10. He and his team settled on the bow and arrow attached to a rope to pass the cable and they perfected this technique by practicing it several times.
  11. He and his crew got an opportunity to travel in the elevator to 104th floor on the day of the event. With their heavy equipment. Call it miracle if you wish.
  12. Finally executed his plans.

How did he achieve what he wanted to ?

  1. The central theme of the whole thing – that is, the events leading to the big event – was a firm belief that he can achieve what he wanted to.
  2. He was committed to it.
  3. He was ready to sacrifice anything and everything to achieve it.
  4. Was there fear in his mind ? Must have had fear but gradually did overcome that fear and succeeded.
  5. He gave everything that he had to achieve it.
  6. He had a good team who also sacrificed, risked and provided solid support to him.
  7. He was focused. He breathed, ate, slept, walked [?] high-wire walk.
  8. He was positive and had overcome all obstacles.

What must have gone through his mind during the event ?

  1. He must have forgotten that the world exists.
  2. He must have forgotten that he is walking at such a high altitude [1350 feet from the ground].
  3. All he saw was the wire.
  4. He focused his mind towards balancing the walk on the high-wire.
  5. He must have walked as if he was performing at a low altitude – like his past performances.

How can someone achieve such a rare feat ?

  1. Discipline.
  2. Preparation.
  3. Courage.
  4. Positive thinking.
  5. Single minded focus.
  6. A team that fully supports.
  7. When others think it is death, he thinks it is his life. Coming out of the fear zone.
  8. Meticulous planning.
  9. Execution.
  10. Skills. Training. Practice.

And what can we learn from his walk on the high-wire ?

  1. If you think you can, you eventually will.
  2. Dreaming is very important. Everything was originally a dream.
  3. Commitment, sacrifice, putting effort, training, practice, single minded focus are important.
  4. Not to get cowed down by obstacles.
  5. Not to get discouraged by friends, family but to continue with your plan against their warnings.
  6. Skill development – is a given.
  7. Positive thinking makes things happen. The whole world conspires with you.
  8. Taking risks.
  9. Great team. And Team work.
  10. Identifying what gives you happiness and relentlessly pursuing it, come what may.

Happy Selling !!